Caton Sollenberger is the guitarist of Boston-based band The Jauntee. Caton can switch between his many styles of playing at the drop of a hat, including his jazz chops, bluegrassy rhythm playing, and mind bending soloing. He runs one of the more impressive pedalboards on the scene, giving him enough sonic options to explore while he and his bandmates jam. Check out Caton’s playing on The Jauntee’s recent live release from July of 2017.

Guitars

2011 Gibson ES-359: “This is my number one. It’s a semi hollow from Gibson’s custom shop, and features a mahogany neck, maple body, and ebony fretboard. I replaced the 57 classics with Rewind Electronics humbuckers, with coil splits. I can’t recommend this pick up guy enough. Even if you don’t know exactly what you want, he’ll help you figure it out. Currently in the process of replacing all of the hardware, so far I have a Faber bridge.”
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Classic Player Jaguar Special HH: “It’s pretty interesting – it has humbuckers which is unusual for a jag, and you can coil split them, but instead of being a switch it’s a blend knob, so some great semi-out-of-phase sounds can be found.”image3

2007 Gibson SG ‘61 Reissue: “57 Classics. No frills, but it was my first real work horse and is really solid.”
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Amps

Mesa Express 5:50+ (6L6) w/ a Mesa 1×12 widebody closed back extension cab. Both have the stock Celestion Black Shadow speakers.image5

Princeton ‘68 Reissue (6V6) “Everything is stock, and does the job well.”:image6

Pedalboard

Signal Chain-

Chain –

CAE 404 > MuFX MicroTron > EHX POG2 > Paul Cochrane Tim (Analogman modded Boss GE-7 in loop) > Analogman Prince of Tone > Moog MF-102 > EHX PitchFork (w/exp) > Pettyjohn Iron > Moog MF Boost > Walrus Audio Julia > Volume (polytune) > Moog MF-103 > Strymon DIG Digital Delay > Supatrem 2 (Splits to Princeton) > Montreal Assembly Count to 5 (w/exp) > Astronomer > Moog MF-104 (w/exp) > Mesa > Boomerang in loop.
Caton on some of his favorite pedals: “I’m super into effects pedals. I have a few others than these listed, and like to switch stuff out and experiment pretty frequently. I could talk about this stuff all day. But I’ll just mention a few: First is the Moog Ring Mod. It’s a pretty interesting effect, both in it’s science and it’s sounds. It can kinda be crazy and unpredictable sounding if you want (think mid 70’s John McLaughlin, or late 90’s Wayne Krantz) or you can get some great octavy sounds, or at certain settings a rich tremolo. I think ring modulation is one of the coolest effects ever created.

Second I’ll mention is the Montreal Assembly Count To 5. This is a pretty wild device. It’s a loop/sample/delay pedal that lets you manipulate your recorded sounds in a lot of ways. Like play something back an octave higher in reverse, twice as fast- or play a loop back in random chunks an octave lower- or play a loop at three different speeds in different directions at the same time. It’s really unique and is way more versatile than I can describe. Really inspiring and another favorite.

I’m a huge fan of Moog and almost have their whole Mooger Fooger line. I would use them all if they weren’t so damn big. Their delay is one of the best analog delays ever made in my opinion. You can control nearly every knob on their pedals via control voltage devices. You can make them interact with each other (for example, I connect my ringmod to my phaser to get a more complex “bi-phase” sound). Plus they just sound amazing. I use the delay with an expression pedal controlling the mix, so I can dial it in and out pretty quickly, from totally dry to totally wet. I also have a little pedal that switches back and forth between 2 LFO settings on the delay (which adds modulation to the delay trails).”